Kitchen Tips & Tools
Chef shares all the best ways to cut an onion and earns over 15 million views
It turns out that there's a right way and a wrong way to chop onions and it all depends on the dish.
Ma Fatima Garcia
09.19.22

Onions give aroma and taste to our food, aside from that; they’re packed with vitamins and minerals.

No wonder they’re a staple.

Did you know that there are many ways to cut an onion depending on how you will use it?

Varun Inamdar, also known as The Bombay Chef of Rajshri Food, shares all the best ways to cut an onion.

Pexels / Los Muertos Crew
Source:
Pexels / Los Muertos Crew

His video has garnered more than 15M views because of how clear his instructions are.

First, you’ll need:

  • A cutting board
  • A sharp knife
Pexels / Karolina Grabowska
Source:
Pexels / Karolina Grabowska
  • Kitchen tissue paper or a piece of cloth
  • Bowl of water
  • Onions
Pexels / mali maeder
Source:
Pexels / mali maeder

The Basics:

First, create a firm grip for your cutting board. To do this, place two to three sheets of kitchen tissue paper on your working table.

Splash some water and then press your cutting board to create a better suction for the cutting board.

If you don’t have kitchen tissue paper, you can use a piece of cloth.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Hold your onion and cut it in half.

Then cut the ends of the onion and peel the skin. Once done, put your onions in a bowl of water.

This step is important so that it lessens molds, fungus, and sulfur. Soak it for ten minutes and then you’re ready to cut your onions.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Vertical Slicing

Place your onion on your cutting board and make sure the flat side faces down.

With a firm grip, rest your knife and rest it against your knuckles. This prevents you from cutting yourself.

Start with fine cuts and edge your fingers backward. When you reach the end, just flip it down and do the same cut. This takes time, so take it easy.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Horizontal Slice

Most steps are like vertical slices. The only difference is you just have to turn it around and slice it horizontally.

You can adjust the thickness according to your liking.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Chopping

Use the tip of your knife for this cut. Again, it’s preferable to use a sharp knife.

Make thin incisions but don’t go all the way. Once you reach the end, grip it and turn the angle of the onion.

Now, make cuts horizontally, again leaving half a centimeter so it won’t go all the way. Last, cut the onion and you’ll end up with small, finely chopped pieces.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Diced

Here, Varun shows us three diced onions. He starts with small cuts by cutting them into six slices. Then turn it and cut it four times horizontally.

Next are the medium-diced onions. He sliced them into 4, then proceeded to cut them four times horizontally.

For the large diced onions, just cut them into three parts vertically and then three parts horizontally.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Petals

This is the easiest cut that you’ll love. First, get half an onion and cut it in the middle. Remove each petal. That’s it.

YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food
Source:
YouTube Screenshot / Rajshri Food

Roundels

Get a whole onion and remove the cap and the root. Peel the onion and rinse.

Turn it sideways with a firm grip. Slice carefully. The thickness is up to you.

Chef Varun reminds everyone to take time and practice and to never rush to avoid accidents. In no time, if you love cooking, you’ll be a pro at cutting onions.

Watch Chef Varun demonstrate his onion-cutting techniques in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Ma Fatima Garcia
hi@sbly.com
Ma Fatima Garcia is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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