Recipes
Woman shares method for poaching eggs so they turn out perfect every time
Anyone who's ever tried to poach an egg can tell you it's an art form. This hack makes it like a walk in the park though.
Cherie Gozon
09.01.21

Wonder how you can make a perfect poached egg?

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

Lisa Bryan has tried and tested many tips that she often found on how to make poached eggs. She tried them and revealed in this video which one works best.

She said it all starts with one thing: a fresh egg.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

According to Lisa, the fresh eggs have firmer, more intact (egg) whites. Older eggs are runnier, and this causes the “wispies,” or those unruly strings of egg whites that make your egg look haphazardly done.

The best egg to use is the freshet one possible; preferably, the ones you recently bought.

Lisa also suggests filling the pot with around three to four inches of water.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

Going under that or using a more shallow pot would result in a flat egg, though it doesn’t matter much depending on how you want your poached eggs to look. Bring water to a boil.

While waiting for it to boil, prepare your eggs.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

If you’re using eggs that have been in the fridge for a while, you can sift out the runny whites by cracking the egg into a mesh sieve and give it a little swirl.

Once it is strained out, transfer the egg into a small bowl because this makes it much easier to pour the egg into the pot.

Also, prepare an ice water bath.

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Place around a dozen of ice cubes in a bowl and add water. This is best if you want to poach eggs ahead and serve later.

Set it aside, and check if the water in the pot is already boiling. If it is, reduce the heat because it’s time to poach some eggs.

There were two methods that Lisa pointed out here: adding salt and adding vinegar.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

She said that adding salt is a big no-no since it adds white wispies to your poached egg. However, adding vinegar is a huge help in solidifying the egg whites.

Don’t worry; your eggs won’t taste like vinegar at all. You can add a tablespoon or two of white or apple cider vinegar.

One method that Lisa approves of is swirling the water in the pot.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

Using a slotted spoon, stir the water to create a vortex. Pour the egg right into the middle, and you’ll have a perfectly shaped poached egg.

You can let it cook for about three minutes if you want a runny yolk, or add 30 seconds for a firmer one.

Use the slotted spoon to get the egg out of the water.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

You can gently tap the egg to make sure it’s cooked and throw it back in the water if you want it to cook some more.

Then, dab the egg on a paper towel to remove excess water and serve it up.

You can place the poached egg in the ice water bath if you want to serve it later.

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Let it sit there for a few seconds and store the egg.

And when you need to serve it up, get a bowl of hot water and immerse the cold egg in it for 20-30 seconds. Note that this method can cook the yolk further.

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YouTube Screenshot|downshiftology

Your poached egg is now ready to be served along with your favorite breakfast.

Get the full tutorial in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Cherie Gozon
hi@sbly.com
Cherie Gozon is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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